Yuck–finishing decisions!

I hate making all those final, detailed finishing decisions. First of all, it means the piece is done and you don’t get to play with it any more. That means there are no more “what ifs” and whatever is decided is IT. Then you actually have to MAKE the decisions, stick with them and carry them out. No changing in the middle–that never works.

I’m trying to finish up a few sample pieces today and still have questions about those pesky final details!

This one is done and is definitely going in a frame. What’s the question? Should I leave the frame wooden or paint it? And if I paint it, what color should it be?

Bd samples3

Pretty much the same questions for this one, but I haven’t totally decided if it should be in a frame–or maybe not this frame. And then, should it have a white or black background? Should any frame be gray, black or red? Details, details, details! Bleh!

Bd samples1 Bd samples2

I did manage to finish one piece (that I can’t show you!) and managed to make all the final decisions without a lot of mental discussion. I wonder why some pieces are like that…

Advertisements

24 thoughts on “Yuck–finishing decisions!

    • Oooh–that’s something I never thought of. Not for these pieces, I’ve decided those frames just will not do, even with a coat of paint. But that finish would look nice with the right piece. Thanks!

      Like

  1. The pieces are lovely. IMHO the frames are too big for the art work. I don’t mean in perimeter, but in width. The thickness of the frame and the wood look heavey and tend to overwhelm. Have you thought about using a thin metal or wood, but in black for the first one. I think the little red one with a thin red metal frame would be awesome with that white background.

    Like

  2. Black is the best option–and it needs to be a relatively thin black frame. Unless you use s wrap around canvas with the work continued around the edges or some complementary color, the wood frames totally obscure the work. If I were looking for work in a gallery, I would pass by these–they look too loving hands at home with a discount at Joannes. (sorry to be blunt) but if you want these works to sell, they need to have their best foot forward.

    S

    Like

    • Dear Sylvia, you’re saying what I didn’t have the nerve to say in that the frames in the photos that Kathy was showing aren’t very high quality. That’s why I gave the link to the on-line frame place in my first posting. For a little bit more than what you’d pay for a frame at a crafts store or affordable local framing place, you can get all kinds of frames…or cover up the frames that you have.

      Like

    • I love that–too loving hands at home with a discount at Joanne’s!!!!! So very true and I’d pass them by, too. THAT’S why I needed some help getting over the notion that just because I had the frames I had to use them on these! Maybe those will work with a wool felted piece–and maybe they’ll go to the re-use center!

      Like

  3. Those wood frames just don’t do it for me! It should be more contemporary and matted. You don’t even want to see the frame when you look at the piece. Your wonderful art piece should take center stage.

    Like

  4. On the first one, black narrow simple frame, please, with a matt that matches the background which looks greenish on my monitor. It will expand the visual size of the piece, I bet. On the second one, the white matt looks good and the frame should be narrow, simple and red to match the thread in the piece. The details in the piece will pop then.
    IMHO

    Like

  5. If I must use a frame, my default color is black. I never use the woodgrain color for anything. But, I do not usually frame anything anymore, I mount my work on 1 1/2 inch deep, wrapped canvas. I agree with Nancy.

    Like

  6. I’m with you here,Kathy. I hate the finishing part. As for framing, what I’ve been doing lately for the Meditation Gardens series,is when the piece is just about finished, I cut it away from the embroidery frame that I’ve been using and permanently attach it to a pre-stretched canvas using for painting. The edges of the quilt go right up to the edges of the canvas, and since I’m using shadow box frames, that raw edge gets covered up. I order the frames from http://www.pictureframes.com on-line. They have a great selection of all kinds of frames, and their prices are better than the local craft and framing stores here in the Washington, DC area. If there’s a frame or two that you’re deciding between, you can order a corner sample for less then $4, so at you can audition the frame without investing the whole amount. When they have a sale, I stock up.

    As for what color to paint the frames, why not invest in one of those big packages of card stock that are sold in the scrap booking sections of craft stores. Then you can try out four colors of papers at the same time, a different color on each side of the frame.Another idea would be to cover the frames with quilt batting and then stretch fabric over them, staple gunning the fabric to the back Another idea would be to paint a pre-cut mat that’s the size of the frame, and painting squiggles, dots, and shapes onto the paper frame to practice before committing to painting something on the wooden frame. Another idea would be to wrap the frame in a complementary wide ribbon (at least 1″), overlapping the wraps as you make your way around the frame. The last wrap gets staple gunned to the back of the frame.
    That’s what I know about frames…
    Mwah! Nancy

    Like

    • I must have known that these were not good decisions when I posted this! I’m quite friendly with my local frame shop and know that everything they do is well worth the price! And their advice has always been great. I knew when I saw my own pictures that these pieces were not going to end up with leftover old wooden frames, even with a coat of paint!

      Like

  7. White background with black frame is how I would finish as well Kathy on the second piece. The top piece I would like to see what picking up the light green from the background would look.

    Like

  8. I am afraid I do not like the frame at all – but of course – it is entirely your decision. I can really see those flowers at the top just clean edged on a white wall Or stretched on a white stretcher. You could even paint the back of the stretcher a brilliant turquoise or lime green. It will not show but throws a coloured light around the work.

    The frame crowds them and boxes them in – but that might be your intention.

    The white surround on the second piece is more appealing. Perhaps a white or charcoal frame to let the work be the star – though I edge towards white.

    Like

    • You are right. The designs need space to show themselves off. I’ve used stretched canvas for a while and don’t know why I just didn’t start with that! No amount of paint can fix the wrong frame!

      Like

  9. My opinion the top picture I would paint the frame the light blue or aqua that is near the top in the middle. The second pic I like the white background and think a charcoal color or black frame would look better.
    Will be interested in seeing what others think. Color decisions are hard for me also.

    Like

Comments are closed.