And the winner….

Yes, the winner of the “WHAT Was I Thinking Award” is none other than yours truly! Our guild creates an amazing number of charity quilts each year and at the meetings there are finished tops that people take home to finish/quilt.

This came up today.

GFlower 1

No one wanted to take it. I had been holding back, thinking that someone would love it as much as I did, but it remained an orphan. I couldn’t help it. I took it. And now I have to finish it.

WHAT.WAS.I.THINKING!!!!

The sewing is not perfect, but not really that bad.

GFlower 2

And it’s all hand sewn.

There are some “fluffy” issues on the outside edges.

GFlower 3

Some of the fabrics are so very interesting.

GFlower 4 GFlower 6 GFlower 5

But look at that first picture again. That quilt is pinned to an 8 foot by 8 foot design wall! It is HUGE!

And I said I would finish it. What was I thinking?

Well, it’s a heritage quilt. It’s a such a traditional reminder of where we started as quilters–every attic had an unfinished Grandmother’s Flower quilt! Let’s see…it’s hand sewn, so it probably should be hand quilted. May not happen–it’s 8′ square! And as much as I used to love hand quilting, my hands can’t take it anymore. I’ll be thinking about that for a while, as well as those fluffy edges and how I’ll finish that part.

But this quilt jumped up and SHOUTED that I must take it home with me, so I had to answer that call.

What was I thinking? That I love this quilt!

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12 thoughts on “And the winner….

  1. I do like the idea of not putting wadding in. I very recently went to see the patchworks of Lucy Boston, I don’t know if you have heard of her, you can find stuff on the web. She sewed throughout the 40’s to the 90’s and only stopped just before her death when she was in her ninety’s so the top you have is probably of her era. She fussy cut wonderfully, only sewed by hand and never put wadding in. She was always looking for the exact fabric which was very difficult during rationing. I think her most famous work is a patchwork of the crosses. Some of the 1″ lozenge hexagons are made up of 3 different fabrics to get the exact effect she was after. I noticed some lovely fussy cutting in your quilt. Some of her patchworks are biiiiig. I wish I could take you all. I was so blown away by her work and her home, Hemingford Grey, a Norman Manor House which is the oldest continuously lived house in England, built in the 1100s. This is probably far more information than you want but I so enjoyed the visit.

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    • Looked her up–beautiful work! I think this one will have batting, but very thin. We shall see…I won’t be getting to it for a while.

      On Mon, Sep 21, 2015 at 3:27 AM, Quirks Ltd. wrote:

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  2. Both Gail and Mary have good ideas; it would definitely make the finishing easier for you and could be an educational opportunity. I was surprised when you popped up and volunteered to take it!

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    • It just spoke to me…I couldn’t help myself! But I think another quilt for those community opportunities. One that might be easier for newbies to quilt!

      On Sun, Sep 20, 2015 at 6:35 PM, Quirks Ltd. wrote:

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        • There may be issues as I examine it more closely, but it looks to be in really good shape overall. I’m not expecting any big problems.

          On Sun, Sep 20, 2015 at 11:13 PM, Quirks Ltd. wrote:

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  3. So glad you raised your hand and took this quilt top home with you. Whatever you decide to do with it, it will be done with appreciation for old time traditional quilting. It’s quite lovely, even as a top. Perhaps it will just get backed as a summer bed topper.

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    • I have never had the patience to make a top like this, but I surely do appreciate the opportunity to preserve the tradition from which it comes. I want so badly to quilt it by machine, but in my heart I know that it needs hand quilting!

      On Sun, Sep 20, 2015 at 2:55 PM, Quirks Ltd. wrote:

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  4. What a tribute to the woman or women that made this top, to actually have an old fashioned quilting bee, or a display at a festival where one could sit down and quilt for awhile. After all, some of those old ones were not perfect, just made to keep warm, or a cover for a bed, or someone in need… wouldn’t have to be hand quilted, that big a project.

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    • You know, this is sounding like maybe something we should think about for our next quilt show. It could be quite an interesting display and activity!

      On Sun, Sep 20, 2015 at 11:23 AM, Quirks Ltd. wrote:

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  5. Just a thought… At the AGM of the Quilting Guild of the British Isles this year (our local groups are not called guilds, only the National one), a quilt was laid out on a table. Guardians were there to watch over it and to thread needles but anyone at the event which lasts three days could just help with quilting for a little while. In this instance we used the old fashioned method of tying it. Have you a State event where you could do something similar? It was very companiable and a great way to meet people, especially if you attended on your own.
    I agree that such treasures should be saved and made welcome. You could have a role of all the quilters that participate. Do you know when it was made and by whom?

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    • This quilt was a donation to our guild, so we don’t know anything about it. Making it a community quilt as you suggest would be a wonderful way to introduce people to quilting, explain the heritage and construction, etc. There are several venues where that type of thing is or could be available. This particular quilt has a new destiny…it’s going to be finished as nicely as I can and it will be one of our yearly fund raising quilts for our guild’s charity. I think it will do well, especially as it’s a useful size for modern beds and just plain pretty!

      On Sun, Sep 20, 2015 at 10:05 AM, Quirks Ltd. wrote:

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